University of Washington - Communication Leadership

Courses

The Communication Leadership curriculum includes core courses and a variety of electives. All courses are 5 credits unless otherwise indicated. Check enrollment status on the PCE Time Schedule (please note there is a delay in the Time Schedule updating after registrations, so classes can fill and still appear open for a few days).

Communication Leadership Course Roster


Winter 2015

CORE:

COM 536: Leadership Through Story and Communities (Crofts)
Saturdays, 9:00am-5:00pm, January 10, 24, February 7, 21, March 7
TBD

Course Description>

In this digital age when the technology of communication is so pervasive and accessible, leadership and creativity go hand in hand for messages to be thoughtfully paired with communication methods. Audiences for these messages are everywhere—your colleagues, your clients, your neighbors, your customers, and complete strangers—and the messages that resonate most are ones that communicate using storytelling as vehicle of trust, persuasion, and a sense of belonging. Through the two lenses of story and community, this foundational class considers an artful approach to social capital in the workplace, 21st Century organizational design and communication patterns, and personal leadership development. We will discuss how to create and connect meaningfully to communities and networks using new forms of communication outreach, modeled in the classroom experience: from the food we eat at lunch to the music soundtrack we listen to at breaks. Students will be asked to consider how their own creative process impacts their livelihood, as well as how their networks and communities sustain and promote their professional and personal growth.


MCCN ELECTIVES:

COM 597 B: The Health of Networks (Rufo)
Thursdays, 6:00-9:50pm
CMU 242

Course Description>

As digital media professionals interested in the future of communications and business, we use terms like social media and social network with an almost casual abandon. And yet we are hard pressed to explain in detail the nature, function, or structure of the “social” formations that structure these “networks.” This is unfortunate, because a more nuanced, more granular understanding of social network formations can help facilitate stable, useful, and attractive social networks and thus enhance the potential success of social media strategies. Fortunately, there is a robust set of literature focusing on “network theory,” literature that tries to understand and anticipate why some networks work better than others. Engaging this theory through digital and analog case studies, this course will explore concepts like small worlds, strong and loose ties, positionality, agent-based modeling, and emergent properties, among other ways of understanding how to advance social networking. The goal is to move beyond social networking as a label and into a deeper, more complex understanding of the phenomena at work beneath the surface of the social formation.


COM 597: Social Spaces and Technology Tools: Dynamics of Community Organization and Participation (Garrido)
Wednesdays, 6:00-9:50pm
CMU 302

Course Description>

Social change comes in a variety of shapes and forms. It takes on different meanings attending to the cultural, social, and political needs of the communities, networks, and organizations that engage, participate, and interact in their pursuit of advancing social goals. Whether it is youth groups mobilizing for democratic goals, migrant communities organizing to advance their rights, women networks interacting across countries to fight gender inequality, communities develop different strategies for organizing and interacting across neighborhoods, states, and nations towards the betterment of societies. Different technology tools are playing a significant role for communities organizing for social change around the world opening new spaces for participation, shaping organizational strategies and enabling opportunities for networking and collaboration beyond their local environments. This course will explore the dynamics of community organization for social change in different cultural, social and political contexts and the ways in which digital media are appropriated attending to these different contexts. Drawing on experiences from around the world, the primary emphasis of the course is to understand dynamics of community organization and participation that lay at the intersection between local contexts and digital media and the different ways in which this interactionshape the types of organizational and engagement strategies of people, communities, and networks.


COM 597 A: Visual Communication: Powerful Storytelling for the Digital Age (Banse)
Tuesdays, 6:00-9:50pm
CMU 302

Course Description>

You’ve heard countless times that a picture is worth a thousand words. Advances in brain science show us that visuals are processed before any other communique. Visuals are perhaps the most influential communications we can deploy to reach people at an emotional level to get people to act on a cause, or to influence their decisions, or get them to buy one product over another. In this course, students will learn how to “show, not tell.” This class will explore the latest research about how the brain processes images, the use of emotions in pictures and video to persuade and motivate, and how to apply that knowledge strategically to communications and community engagement, whether for nonprofits, private or public sector work. We will review case studies highlighting effective and ineffective visual storytelling approaches – how one strategic choice of images worked and how a different set of images turned off an audience. Students will come out of the course with practical approaches and tools for making their marketing and communications projects more visual and effective.


MCDM ELECTIVES:

COM 588: Marketing and Branding in Digital Communication (Marr)
Mondays, 6:00-9:50pm
CMU 302

Course Description>

This course is designed for students that will be utilizing their MCDM education and experience in the marketing arenas in businesses and organizations (including non-profits) or in leadership functions where an understanding of marketing is an important skill. The focus on the course will be on how to best utilize digital media vehicles along with more traditional forms of communications and advertising (and other marketing or Research and Development functions). Because of the ever changing nature of the advertising world with the advances and acceptances of digital media platforms, we will showcase industry “heavy hitters” from local marketing and advertising agencies to discuss the trends and issues the industry faces, using real life situations to explore alternatives and solutions. We will also explore how new media can be used with traditional channels of distribution (clicks and bricks), as well as in the R & D functions by encouraging and mining information from current and potential customers. Students that have not had a basic marketing class will be assigned pre-course supplemental readings and we will do a quick review at our first session so that everyone has a common understanding of the subject before we move into the more cutting edge concepts.

Student Testimonial>

“Marketing and Branding is one of the most useful and fun classes that I have taken within the Communication Leadership program. This course offers updated and relevant information regarding the exponential growth of marketing in the digital sphere. This class builds upon the basics of branding and marketing skills and gives you new skills to take to other courses and/or to your career. You will also discuss the importance of branding and the role that it plays in company evolution as well as with a start up business. The homework involved in this class is engaging and useful to every lecture. The instructor has made sure to include guest speakers from all walks of the industry. From their insight, the class content becomes more real, impactful, and valuable to your education. I highly recommend this class to any member of the Communication Leadership program.”


COM 597 C: Multi-Platform Content Strategy: A Practical Approach to Immersive and Responsive Content (Zeller)
Meets Research Methods Core Requirement
Tuesdays, 6:00-9:50pm
CMU 126

Course Description>

In the ever-changing world of search algorithms and content marketing, businesses have become focused on maximizing the impact of their online content. Content is no longer simply what is written on the page, rather it has become the integrated discipline of Content Strategy. This class will provide students with the skills and practice for the movement of thought from a Content Editor to a Content Strategist. Using Kristina Halvorson’s text “Content Strategy for the Web” to provide the template for structure around editorial content, students will practice the fundamentals on creating a content strategy through auditing content, developing governance, building a scorecard and defining key metrics for content. Additional readings on topics such as multi-channel delivery, collaborative authoring, knowledge management, user-generated content, and SEO will support further analysis and conversation around defining quality and relevant content. Students will leave this class with a tool-kit, vocabulary and skills to approach content in a strategic context.

Student Testimonial>

“Andrea Zeller’s course is essential for understanding both how to implement content strategy (you’ll tackle all the phases of a real-world project) and how to present content strategy conclusions to colleagues and employers. The class is a perfect introduction to the discipline of content strategy for newcomers, but as a current content strategist, the work I did in class paid off for me professionally. I recently accepted a position with a major tech company as a strategist, and used skills and examples directly from this class in the interview process. Thanks Andrea!”


COM 597 D: Mobile Entrepreneurship in Emerging Markets (Sey)
Tuesdays, 6:00-9:50pm
CMU 242

Course Description>

This course explores patterns of mobile phone appropriation in emerging market economies and the contribution of micro-entrepreneurs and consumers in fueling innovation in the industry. We will examine the concept of information and communication technologies for development (ICT4D) and how it has been applied to micro-entrepreneurship in the mobile phone industry in emerging economies. We will discuss the nature of entrepreneurship in emerging and advanced economies; patterns of mobile phone appropriation by different parties; and their impact on developments in the mobile phone industry, the livelihoods of mobile phone users and micro-entrepreneurs, and national socio-economic development agendas. You can expect to come away with an appreciation of the nature of micro-entrepreneurial activity in emerging economies and how it fits into the complex dynamics in the mobile phone industry. Our discussions should equip you to critically assess ICT4D programs in general, and in particular those that focus on providing employment in the ICT industry for people with limited resources. For your class project, you will prepare a case study on a selected mobile phone development, service or project with a micro-entrepreneurial component.

Student Testimonial>

“Mobile Phone in Development taught by Dr. Araba Sey, was a brand new elective offered last summer. It was my first class into this program. What makes the class so great is Dr. Sey’s expertise. She brings relevance and her current research on Mobile in Development to the class – research she is doing in Ghana. In the US, many of us have smartphones with the ability to check mail, access the internet, send text messages. We use them for personal use, school and for work. In developing countries, mobile is used differently, especially in rural regions. Mobile phones are tools used to sustain a livelihood. You learn a lot about Technology Appropriation and how regions use the basics of mobile technology to bridge information gaps between rural urban areas. You also learn about government regulations. I found the class to be engaging, informative and eye opening. The class makes you think about mobile technology in a new way; and the possibilities for developing countries.”


COM 583: Multimedia Storytelling: Digital Distribution and the Story (Keller)
Wednesdays, 6:00-9:50pm
CMU 242

Course Description>

The landscape of web-distributed video can be broadly divided into three motifs: Entertainment, Newsgathering, and Business Communication. From YouTube to Vimeo, Netflix to Hulu, 12seconds.tv to Facebook, online video is a storytelling revolution. Or is it? How do storytelling choices affect message reception? Storytelling has been part of the human experience since the formation of language. Today, the technology that surrounds the “tell” of a story (the modes and channels of communication) directly shape the immersive experience felt by the viewer, while leveraging the lessons of narrative and myth. This course focuses on the decisions we make when we tell our stories. This course is both theoretical and practical. Students will be afforded the skills to create and distribute video stories. Additionally, students will be expected to display critical thinking around point of view, audience targeting, ROI success criteria, methodology, and production standards. Students are expected to exercise the craft of content creation while at the same time critically evaluating and deconstructing content they see in the marketplace.

Student Testimonial>

“Drew Keller’s Multimedia Storytelling class deftly weaves in the interconnected components of effective multimedia communication. Whether you are a novice or expert videographer, this class takes you to the next level by covering video syndication, platform selection, and monetization. In addition to perfectly balancing theory, guest lectures and hands on work, Drew went above and beyond by providing weekend tutorials on video composition, shooting and editing. He even provided 1:1 help during work!”


COM 597 E: Advanced User Research and UX Strategies (Levine)
Meets Research Methods Core Requirement
Thursdays, 6:00-9:50pm
CMU 302

Course Description>

What makes interactive experiences compelling and how are they designed? This course analyzes existing interfaces, discussing what makes them effective, and provides an overview of tools and theories that guide user experience designers in their practice. Students will be introduced to information architecture (wireframes, sitemaps), information design (information graphics) and visual design (composition, typography, composition, color) and encouraged to apply their learning towards practical design assignments. Our focus is on computer interfaces but is not limited to its traditional “keyboard/mouse/monitor” triangle, as we will also discuss innovative consumer products such as Kinect. The course “Foundational User Centered Design” will provide good foundation for discussion in this class but is not required. A basic understanding of Adobe Creative Suite software, CSS or Visio is helpful, but not necessary for success in this course.

Student Testimonial>

“Jason Levine’s Interactivity Design: Practice class was a great follow-up to the Interactivity Design: Usability class. It provided a strong overview of the theories of information architecture and information design. The final project was a culmination of the skills learned over the duration of the quarter. The weekly assignments provided an effective way to learn the components taught in the class – including Discovery, User Studies, Information Architecture, and User Experience Design. In fact, our group was able to create portfolio-worthy deliverables. Typically, the class started with lecture and discussion, followed by discussion of the weekly assignments, followed by team collaboration time. In addition, the readings and occasional guest lecturers provided additional invaluable insight into the field. This format allowed for a pleasant and productive learning environment, despite the seemingly arduous 4-hour class session. I enjoyed the class so much, I plan to pursue further study and work in the field.”


COM 592: Flip the Media: Content Strategy and Community Engagement Practicum (Stonehill) 1-2 Credits
TBD
CMU 244

Course Description>

Flip the Media is the independent student publication of the Comm Lead program. It is an outward-facing channel for news and analysis from Comm Lead students and faculty on the crossroads of media, culture and technology. Autumn quarter a select group of independent study students will have a unique opportunity to reinvent Flip the Media, bringing the channel up to date with the latest platforms and content strategies. Participating students will develop marketable skills in content strategy, community engagement, analytics, SEO, WordPress, web design, brand development and online journalism, and are afforded significant publication opportunities. This course is available as an independent study for one or two credits, depending on commitment, or as a non-credit experience. Contact Faculty Adviser Alex Stonehill at stonehil(at)u.washington.edu for more information.


Spring 2015

MCCN ELECTIVES:

COM 587: Business Fundamentals in Digital Communication (McPherson)
Wednesdays, 6:00-9:50pm
CMU 242

Course Description>

A practical understanding of key business fundamentals is essential in being able to create and implement communications strategies in today’s organizations. This course will be useful for students that want to make a difference in large and small businesses, who are interested in starting their own business or NGO, or for those working with constituents towards a goal. We will cover the following subjects: Marketing/Sales, basics of Finance and Accounting (including understanding ROI), Operations, and Implementation. In addition to discussing materials and concepts in these business areas, students will be applying what they are learning by building a business plan or another type of implementation plan of their own or on a team that is of interest to several students. As a result of taking this course, students will have a better understanding of the underlying issues facing business and organizations and be able to develop more relevant strategies and tactics to leverage the opportunities and challenges. At the completion of the class, students will be able present their ideas and initiatives in a more persuasive way to the decision makers in organizations by aligning their suggestions with the needs and issues facing the organization.

Student Testimonial>

“Business Fundamentals is the perfect crash course for any up and coming entrepreneurs in the program. While developing a comprehensive business plan in 10 weeks is a tall and, at time, stressful order, the course guides you, step by step, through product development, marketing, operations, finance, and more. It can be a great exercise to firm up your understanding of business in general or a challenge to take the first step towards making a reality out of your bright idea and produce something that’s ready to be pitched to investors.This class allowed me, as a marketer for a startup, to deepen my knowledge of the other areas within my company and also helped me better understand how each area interrelates to one another, as well as the priorities of my executives and board members. For me, now, business plans are no longer an insurmountable and intimidating project, but something that I know I can produce with confidence.”


COM 597: The Law and Ethics of Community Building in Private, Public, and Nonprofit Entities (Tausch-Lapora)
Meets Law and Ethics Core Requirement
Mondays, 6:00-9:50pm
CMU 126

Course Description>

All organizations — private, public and non-profit — inevitably encounter legal and ethical challenges when building and engaging with their communities and networks. Leaders must be able to identify, anticipate, and problem solve issues such as how legal relationships are created and to whom legal and ethical duties are owed. They must also grapple with challenges such as how to balance privacy concerns with building an organization’s base, who owns specific content or ideas, and what advocacy strategies to employ when defining deliverables and implementing initiatives. This course considers and juxtaposes the legal and ethical realities of community building through a cross-sector approach. We will survey a wide array of case studies in which law and ethics may overlap, conflict, or be silent. We will engage in practical story exercises that maximize understanding of how law and ethics impact how organizations communicate to clients, customers, and constituencies. Throughout the course, students are encouraged to bring in legal and ethical issues from their professional experiences to enrich discussion of course topics such as legal relationships and duties, privacy, ownership, and making advocacy choices.


MCDM ELECTIVES:

COM 569: Gaming, Virtual Worlds, and Communication (Rufo)
Thursdays, 6:00-9:50pm
CMU 242 & 244

Course Description>

No technology better defines the digital media experience than the video game. What was once the domain of the maladjusted introvert has become the dominant new media experience, with whole generations of console and PC gamers competing against other players online, crafting avatars and walking the halls of virtual worlds, playing, cheating, and building their “second lives.” This course will explore these virtual environments, mapping the communication that happens within and through this new medium. We will ground the class through a variety of game-playing, both in and outside of the classroom, and will do so in a way that works for “noobs” as well as hardcore gamers. Speakers will include those that live, breathe, and design video games right here in the Seattle area, one of the hubs for national and international video game production. Emphasis will be placed on determining strategies by which new video games may solve old communication problems.

Student Testimonial>

“I rediscovered an old passion in the MCDM’s course Gaming and Virtual Worlds. I rediscovered that I like to make learning fun. I consider fun and play fundamental qualities in a full life experience. Up until this class, the focus of my career and passion had been in the classroom and in the edit suite. My experience in Dr. Rufo’s class gave my lifelong passion new direction in analog games and the Kinect. I now apply the theories I learned in this class most everyday as I work as a Producer and PM for Microsoft in the IEB division and as I pursue personal projects to ensure learning stays fun for people of all ages. My new favorite VUI command is ‘Xbox! Get me a victory milk!'”


COM 583: Multimedia Storytelling: Immersive Production Studio (Macklin)
Tuesdays, 6:00-9:50pm
CMU 318E

Course Description>

Emerging models of interactive and immersive (full & any screen, scrolling and responsive) storytelling are disrupting the ways we can reach and engage with our constituents. This course in Studio Production will have a deep concentration on the production aspects and development tools necessary to create Snow Fall-like immersive web stories. We will be coupling a critical look at these emerging models while working through the technical aspects of story creation and the implementation of web deveopment tools and platforms (HTML 5 & jQuery). This will be a project-based course through which students will acquire the strategy and skills to make informed designs about the development and use of immersive storytelling processes. Previous multimedia production and web development is not necessary, though a willingness to learn and play with the underlying technologies is a must.


COM 597: Graphic Storytelling as Transmedia Platform (Salkowitz)
Saturdays, 9:00am-5:00pm, April 4, 18, May 2, 16, 30
CMU 302

Course Description>

Understanding how to use words and pictures in combination to tell stories is a core competency for communicators in the digital era. This class will provide you with a solid understanding of the medium of sequential art and visual narrative (aka “comics”) and the practical ability to incorporate visual storytelling into traditional, digital, and transmedia projects in a variety of entertainment, business, education, social and journalistic scenarios.
Why comics? Comics and sequential art have gone from the margins of popular culture to the center of a multi-billion dollar global industry and a respected art-form. Many of the most popular movies, television, videogames and transmedia projects are adapted from comics and/or depend heavily on storytelling styles that originated with this unique medium. Issues of digital distribution, adaptation and audience engagement that arise in today’s “comics culture” affect the future of publishing, technology, social media and gaming. Beyond the world of entertainment, the principles of visual narrative are becoming fundamental to all manner of storytelling projects, global initiatives and creative enterprises.
This class will explore the history and potential of comics as a storytelling medium in the digital age in both a media studies and business dimension, incorporating both theory and practice. We will look at the anatomy of the medium in all its forms; study how comics are used in entertainment, literary, documentary, journalistic, educational, training and business communications contexts; examine the challenges of bringing comic-based subject matter to other media; explore the business issues associated with the explosion of comics in the wider culture; and create an original digital transmedia project incorporating the visual language of comics.


COM 597: Social Media Analytics and the Measurement of Social Marketing Success (Steel)
Meets Research Methods Core Requirement
Wednesdays, 6:00-9:50pm
CMU 302

Course Description>

This course will introduce students to the fundamentals of social media analytics and social listening & monitoring, with a focus on tracking the overall social health of brands. We will compare and evaluate some of the analytics tools on the market and learn how to perform a social landscape audit, establish KPIs (key performance indicators), set social marketing goals, and determine methods for campaign performance tracking. We’ll deep dive into the components that comprise a thorough monthly monitoring report, including managed channel (Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, etc.) success metrics and KPI tracking, conversation sentiment and themes, competitive share of voice, influencer identification, data insights, listening & monitoring topics, and ROI. At the end of the quarter, we’ll examine the latest debates, tools, technologies, and social channels and their implications for social media analytics. Students who successfully complete the course will have gained hands-on experience analyzing and developing insights and tactical recommendations based on social media data. They will also leave armed with resources for following the latest trends and developments in social media marketing.


COM 597: Legal and Privacy Issues with Data Security, Big Data, Cloud, Internet of Things, and Intellectual Property (Baker)
Meets Law and Ethics Core Requirement
Tuesdays, 6:00-9:50pm
CMU 302

Course Description>

Coming soon.


COM 597: Programming and Data Science for Social Media (Hill)
Mondays, 6:00-9:50pm
CMU 302

Course Description>

Coming soon.


Past Quarters


Spring 2014

MCCN ELECTIVES:

COM 587: Business Fundamentals in Digital Communication (McPherson)
Please Note: While fundamentally geared towards MCCN students this quarter, COM 587 is a non-repeatable class, so those who previously took the MCDM version cannot receive credit for retaking it.
Mondays, 6:00-9:50pm
CMU 302

Course Description>

A practical understanding of key business fundamentals is essential in being able to create and implement communications strategies in today’s organizations. This course will be useful for students that want to make a difference in large and small businesses, who are interested in starting their own business or NGO, or for those working with constituents towards a goal. We will cover the following subjects: Marketing/Sales, basics of Finance and Accounting (including understanding ROI), Operations, and Implementation. In addition to discussing materials and concepts in these business areas, students will be applying what they are learning by building a business plan or another type of implementation plan of their own or on a team that is of interest to several students. As a result of taking this course, students will have a better understanding of the underlying issues facing business and organizations and be able to develop more relevant strategies and tactics to leverage the opportunities and challenges. At the completion of the class, students will be able present their ideas and initiatives in a more persuasive way to the decision makers in organizations by aligning their suggestions with the needs and issues facing the organization.

Student Testimonial>

“Business Fundamentals is the perfect crash course for any up and coming entrepreneurs in the program. While developing a comprehensive business plan in 10 weeks is a tall and, at time, stressful order, the course guides you, step by step, through product development, marketing, operations, finance, and more. It can be a great exercise to firm up your understanding of business in general or a challenge to take the first step towards making a reality out of your bright idea and produce something that’s ready to be pitched to investors.This class allowed me, as a marketer for a startup, to deepen my knowledge of the other areas within my company and also helped me better understand how each area interrelates to one another, as well as the priorities of my executives and board members. For me, now, business plans are no longer an insurmountable and intimidating project, but something that I know I can produce with confidence.”


COM 597: Innovation Communities: How Business Can Harness the DIY Dynamic (Hill)
Tuesdays, 6:00-9:50pm
CMU 242

Course Description>

Can innovation be crowdsourced? Equipped with a range of new digital communication technologies, “users” innovate every day — creating solutions to their own problems through sharing and collaboration. Disruptive new models of collective innovation are emerging in forums, in “free” and “open source” efforts, and in hacking initiatives. Organizations increasingly want to tap into this community-driven DIY dynamic, but frequently struggle to structure their own innovation processes in relation to these unique communities. This class will explore some of the techniques that firms can use to harness this surge of innovation by introducing a new “democratized” or “user-centric” innovation paradigm. We’ll look at how user communities bolster their ability to innovate through specific technological tools and innovative social routines. Through practical examples, you will learn how to effectively use communities both as sources of inspiration and as collaborators.


COM 597: Community Engagement: Communication Design for the Networked Age (Marr)
Please Note: While fundamentally geared towards MCCN students this quarter, this class will not substantially differ from the MCDM “Marketing and Branding in Digital Communication” class, so those who previously took the MCDM version cannot receive credit for this class.
Wednesdays, 6:00-9:50pm
CMU 242

Course Description>

This course is designed for students that will be utilizing their MCCN education and experience in the marketing arenas in businesses and organizations (including non-profits) or in leadership functions where an understanding of marketing is an important skill. The focus on the course will be on how to best utilize digital media vehicles along with more traditional forms of communications and advertising (and other marketing or Research and Development functions). Because of the ever changing nature of the advertising world with the advances and acceptances of digital media platforms, we will showcase industry “heavy hitters” from local marketing and advertising agencies to discuss the trends and issues the industry faces, using real life situations to explore alternatives and solutions. We will also explore how new media can be used with traditional channels of distribution (clicks and bricks), as well as in the R & D functions by encouraging and mining information from current and potential customers. Students that have not had a basic marketing class will be assigned pre-course supplemental readings and we will do a quick review at our first session so that everyone has a common understanding of the subject before we move into the more cutting edge concepts.


COM 592: Marketing Policy and Engaging with Diverse Societies: Public Health, Culture, and Video-Based Communication (Edgerly) 1 Credit
Meets Research Methods Core Requirement if full 3-quarter sequence taken
Mondays, 6:00-7:50pm
CMU 321

Course Description>

Spring quarter will continue the work of disseminating public health discussion videos created Autumn quarter, by actively recruiting focus group participants, continuing to develop a guided discussion protocol, and conducting focus group observations with
those participants that students recruit. Students should be prepared to spend time writing recruitment texts, finding locations to post them, talking with possible participants, and setting up and running focus group discussions with video screenings. This project requires time, and a willingness to reach out to the community, engage in discussion, and ask questions. Students will learn the basics of setting up and running a qualitative, community-focused research project, as well as how to do field observations, take notes, and analyze initial data.


MCDM ELECTIVES:

COM 558: Digital Media Law and Policy (Baker)
Meets Law & Ethics Core Requirement
Tuesdays, 6:00-9:50pm
MGH 271

Course Description>

Legal issues are pervasive in the use and implementation of all types of digital media. Copyright owners consistently struggle with how to monetize content without alienating end users, bloggers confront the parameters and limits of free expression, and consumers are more and more sensitized as to how companies will make use of their personal information. This course examines the existing frameworks that govern how companies, organizations, and end users approach free expression, intellectual property, privacy, security, and advertising. Students are provided practical guidance for applying these frameworks to varying news, entertainment, social media, and digital media environments.

Student Testimonial>

“Law & Policy is usually among the favorites of each cohort, and I completely understand that! Kraig is an incredibly knowledgeable professor who is detail oriented, and cares deeply about getting his students interested in the material. Law seems like a boring subject at first, but he makes sure that the material is tailored to the interests of each class and gives his students the freedom to adapt the course to their passions and learning styles. Also, this course is incredibly relevant to many questions we always have looming over our heads about copyright and content. This subject will continuously be relevant, and Kraig does a great job at making sure you’re confident in that.”


COM 569: Gaming, Virtual Worlds, and Communication (Rufo)
Thursdays, 6:00-9:50pm
CMU 242 & 244

Course Description>

No technology better defines the digital media experience than the video game. What was once the domain of the maladjusted introvert has become the dominant new media experience, with whole generations of console and PC gamers competing against other players online, crafting avatars and walking the halls of virtual worlds, playing, cheating, and building their “second lives.” This course will explore these virtual environments, mapping the communication that happens within and through this new medium. We will ground the class through a variety of game-playing, both in and outside of the classroom, and will do so in a way that works for “noobs” as well as hardcore gamers. Speakers will include those that live, breathe, and design video games right here in the Seattle area, one of the hubs for national and international video game production. Emphasis will be placed on determining strategies by which new video games may solve old communication problems.

Student Testimonial>

“I rediscovered an old passion in the MCDM’s course Gaming and Virtual Worlds. I rediscovered that I like to make learning fun. I consider fun and play fundamental qualities in a full life experience. Up until this class, the focus of my career and passion had been in the classroom and in the edit suite. My experience in Dr. Rufo’s class gave my lifelong passion new direction in analog games and the Kinect. I now apply the theories I learned in this class most everyday as I work as a Producer and PM for Microsoft in the IEB division and as I pursue personal projects to ensure learning stays fun for people of all ages. My new favorite VUI command is ‘Xbox! Get me a victory milk!'”


COM 583: Multimedia Storytelling: Immersive Production Studio (Macklin)
Tuesdays, 6:00-9:50pm
CMU 318E

Course Description>

Emerging models of interactive and immersive (full & any screen, scrolling and responsive) storytelling are disrupting the ways we can reach and engage with our constituents. This course in Studio Production will have a deep concentration on the production aspects and development tools necessary to create Snow Fall-like immersive web stories. We will be coupling a critical look at these emerging models while working through the technical aspects of story creation and the implementation of web deveopment tools and platforms (HTML 5 & jQuery). This will be a project-based course through which students will acquire the strategy and skills to make informed designs about the development and use of immersive storytelling processes. Previous multimedia production and web development is not necessary, though a willingness to learn and play with the underlying technologies is a must.


COM 597: Graphic Storytelling as Transmedia Platform (Salkowitz)
Saturdays, 9:00am-5:00pm, April 5, 19, May 3, 17, 31
CMU 302

Course Description>

Understanding how to use words and pictures in combination to tell stories is a core competency for communicators in the digital era. This class will provide you with a solid understanding of the medium of sequential art and visual narrative (aka “comics”) and the practical ability to incorporate visual storytelling into traditional, digital, and transmedia projects in a variety of entertainment, business, education, social and journalistic scenarios.
Why comics? Comics and sequential art have gone from the margins of popular culture to the center of a multi-billion dollar global industry and a respected art-form. Many of the most popular movies, television, videogames and transmedia projects are adapted from comics and/or depend heavily on storytelling styles that originated with this unique medium. Issues of digital distribution, adaptation and audience engagement that arise in today’s “comics culture” affect the future of publishing, technology, social media and gaming. Beyond the world of entertainment, the principles of visual narrative are becoming fundamental to all manner of storytelling projects, global initiatives and creative enterprises.
This class will explore the history and potential of comics as a storytelling medium in the digital age in both a media studies and business dimension, incorporating both theory and practice. We will look at the anatomy of the medium in all its forms; study how comics are used in entertainment, literary, documentary, journalistic, educational, training and business communications contexts; examine the challenges of bringing comic-based subject matter to other media; explore the business issues associated with the explosion of comics in the wider culture; and create an original digital transmedia project incorporating the visual language of comics.


COM 597: Social Media Analytics and the Measurement of Social Marketing Success (Au)
Meets Research Methods Core Requirement
Wednesdays, 6:00-9:50pm
CMU 302

Course Description>

This course will introduce students to the fundamentals of social media analytics and social listening & monitoring, with a focus on tracking the overall social health of brands. We will compare and evaluate some of the analytics tools on the market and learn how to perform a social landscape audit, establish KPIs (key performance indicators), set social marketing goals, and determine methods for campaign performance tracking. We’ll deep dive into the components that comprise a thorough monthly monitoring report, including managed channel (Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, etc.) success metrics and KPI tracking, conversation sentiment and themes, competitive share of voice, influencer identification, data insights, listening & monitoring topics, and ROI. At the end of the quarter, we’ll examine the latest debates, tools, technologies, and social channels and their implications for social media analytics. Students who successfully complete the course will have gained hands-on experience analyzing and developing insights and tactical recommendations based on social media data. They will also leave armed with resources for following the latest trends and developments in social media marketing.

Student Testimonial>

“Vanessa Au’s Social Media Metrics class provided a great overview of how (and what) to track in order to best calculate the ROI of your social media channels. The guest speakers were all leaders in their field, and offered an excellent complement to the class lectures and readings. Professor Au’s slide decks were great and functioned as useful takeaways for each class session. This class is a great intro for anyone wanting to learn more about measuring social media impact and offers practical instruction on how best to do so. If you already do this for a living, you may find some of the lectures redundant, but for those that are just getting started, this is a great way to get a head start on an essential skill set of social channel management.”


COM 597: Entrepreneurship in the Mobile Phone Industry in Emerging Economies (Sey)
Mondays, 6:00-9:50pm
Please note this class will begin one week late on April 7 and end on June 7. Due to the Memorial Day Holiday, the course will meet on Monday, June 2 and then end with a full Saturday session on June 7.
CMU 242

Course Description>

This course explores patterns of mobile phone appropriation in emerging market economies and the contribution of micro-entrepreneurs and consumers in fueling innovation in the industry. We will examine the concept of information and communication technologies for development (ICT4D) and how it has been applied to micro-entrepreneurship in the mobile phone industry in emerging economies. We will discuss the nature of entrepreneurship in emerging and advanced economies; patterns of mobile phone appropriation by different parties; and their impact on developments in the mobile phone industry, the livelihoods of mobile phone users and micro-entrepreneurs, and national socio-economic development agendas. You can expect to come away with an appreciation of the nature of micro-entrepreneurial activity in emerging economies and how it fits into the complex dynamics in the mobile phone industry. Our discussions should equip you to critically assess ICT4D programs in general, and in particular those that focus on providing employment in the ICT industry for people with limited resources. For your class project, you will prepare a case study on a selected mobile phone development, service or project with a micro-entrepreneurial component.

Student Testimonial>

“Mobile Phone in Development taught by Dr. Araba Sey, was a brand new elective offered last summer. It was my first class into this program. What makes the class so great is Dr. Sey’s expertise. She brings relevance and her current research on Mobile in Development to the class – research she is doing in Ghana. In the US, many of us have smartphones with the ability to check mail, access the internet, send text messages. We use them for personal use, school and for work. In developing countries, mobile is used differently, especially in rural regions. Mobile phones are tools used to sustain a livelihood. You learn a lot about Technology Appropriation and how regions use the basics of mobile technology to bridge information gaps between rural urban areas. You also learn about government regulations. I found the class to be engaging, informative and eye opening. The class makes you think about mobile technology in a new way; and the possibilities for developing countries.”


COM 597: Leadership in the Digital Age: Establishing Authenticity through Story (Crofts) 3 Credits
Please Note: This class will not substantially differ from the Cohort 13 required core class “Leadership Through Story and Community: Creativity and the Digital Age” class, so this class is appropriate for Cohort 12 students or earlier.
Saturdays (May 3, 17, and 31) 9:00am-5:00pm
CMU 126

Course Description>

Leadership skills are not just traits you are born with, but competencies you learn and refine throughout your life. Today, with office structures flattening and transparency at a premium, authentic leadership is critical for success in the digital age. Whether it is crowdsourced decision-making, the arrival of the Millennial Generation as customers and colleagues, or the wider reach of personal narrative in the age of new media, the challenges and opportunities that leaders face are evolving as quickly as the technologies themselves. In this course, we will consider how the rise of new media has amplified the teachings of traditional leadership development scholarship, called into question outdated models of engagement, and accelerated the need for genuine relationship building. As leadership development is a deeply personal pursuit, we will emphasize individual leadership development and theory, nested in the context of leading within an organizational structure. We will pay particular attention to the concept of storytelling, or life narrative, as a key leadership tool in the 21st century. Leaders at all levels and across all sectors will be able to apply teachings from this class to their work.

Student Testimonial>

“When I first read up on Leadership in the Digital Age, I had planned to take it as a sort of capstone to the end of my time with the MCDM. I figured by then, I’d fully be ready to learn about and embrace leadership. However, through last minute scheduling changes I ended up taking as part of my first quarter in the program, which ended up being the option I recommend! The term “leadership” I think can be a bit loaded, with the expectation that you are a manager of people or high-up in the organizational chain. I am neither of these. But through this course, I learned leadership really has nothing to do with that. The class is a very good combination of enlightening readings, discussion based class within a small group (you really get to know everyone by the end of the course!), and great guest lecturers from the community. I was surprised that the eight-hour weekend classes actually seemed to flow by very quickly, and Anita organizes your time during these days very well, so the classroom time is well spent. There is a lot of reading, writing and the final project that pushed me out of my comfort zone to interview local leaders I admired. The course is challenging, but in the best way – I learned a lot about leadership and even more about myself. Anita is a very nurturing presence and allows for a very safe space to explore your own belief system, and I left the course with a major boost to my self-confidence. I highly recommend that everyone take this course during their time in the MCDM, it should be a requirement!”


COM 592 E: Table Talk: Deathoverdinner 2.0 (Hebb & Macklin) 1-5 Credits
Wednesdays, 6:00-8:00pm, April 9, 23, May 14, 28
Off Campus

Course Description>

In Fall 2012, Communication Leadership Associate Director Scott Macklin and Community Fellow Michael Hebb and eight MCDM students held a Leader Communications design studio Independent Study to develop the concept www.deathoverdinner.org (DOD) with dozens of leaders in End of Life Care. In August 2013, DOD launched and has inspired over 10,000 individuals to gather family and loved ones and hold a structured and thoughtful conversation about life and death while breaking bread. DOD has received remarkable press (The New York Times, Bloomberg, USA Today, National Public Radio, The Los Angeles Times, The Boston Globe, The Chicago Tribune, Forbes, The Huffington Post, The Atlantic) for its ingenuity and effectiveness as a digital platform. DOD has been credited with inspiring an international movement. Now Scott and Michael are going back into the studio with partners CIVILIZATION, The Huffington Post, Newport Academy (possibly ADAI/UW Health Sciences) to create a companion platform that could potentially reach 10x the audience of Deathoverdinner.org. -The topic: Drugs, Addiction, Rehabilitation, and Policy. The War on Drugs has been judged to be a colossal failure. We aim to set a model for how adults talk to their children and to one another about this critical issue. This Independent Study will put students directly onto the design team as we review the success and failures of DOD, begin designing and building Drugs over Dinner, and launch the platform with our partners.


Summer 2014

MCCN ELECTIVES:

COM 597: Ethics for Communicating Across Local and Global Networks (Bardouille-Crema)
Meets Law & Ethics Core Requirement
Saturdays, 9:00am-5:00pm, June 28, July 12, 26, August 2, 16
CMU 126

Course Description>

An ever increasingly globalized world presents both opportunities and challenges to how we communicate within and across networks. Local communities are influenced by a global perspective and communications designed for specific networks will reach father than can be imagined or tracked. This presents ethical challenges when building and engaging with a range of communities and networks. All facets of communications – be it advertising or advocacy campaigns, print newspapers or tweeting – will have an impact on those it reaches, and subsequently will affect the entity from which the communication came. Understanding the ethical implications embedded in a range of engagement models equips communication leaders to make smart, strategic, and sensitive decisions in how they design communication strategies. In this course, you will learn key analysis skills to be able to best apply ethical, cultural and contextually-appropriate strategies to communicate and interact with a range of networks and sub-networks, both locally and globally. Using class discussion, case examples, and projects, the class will explore the explicit and implicit messaging tactics in present day communications and apply analytical skills and techniques for developing constructive and ethical messaging in all aspects of communications.


COM 597: Games as Communication: Online Strategies for Engaging Users and Customers (Lingle)
Meets Research Methods Core Requirement
Mondays, 6:00-9:50pm
CMU 126

Course Description>

Gamification has had its turn in the spotlight, promising new levels of user interaction and attracting both advocates and critics. While its successes are compelling, media professionals know it’s never easy, and often impossible, to apply generic solutions to your own communication challenges. Looking beyond the badges and buzzwords, the core ideas of games and play do tap into powerful human instincts. Drawing on those principles, we can think more deeply about users and customers, and build more rewarding experiences for them as real people. Digging into research and real-world cases, students in this course will develop insights into games and gaming as a mode of communication. In addition to critically evaluating “gamification” as a marketing strategy, we will go further by exploring such concepts as crowds, rules, identity, and social control. In a world where environments are increasingly digitized and datafied, students will analyze what’s behind our impulse to count, compare, and compete, whether with friends, strangers, or the objects around us. By the end of the course, we will have a more grounded understanding of what games are and how we can strategically and successfully apply them to communication.


MCDM ELECTIVES:

COM 587: Business Fundamentals in Digital Communications (McPherson)
Wednesdays, 6:00-9:50pm
CMU 242

Course Description>

A practical understanding of key business fundamentals is essential in being able to create and implement digital communications strategies in today’s organizations. This course will be useful for students that are employed in large and small businesses, wanting to start their own business, or for those working in or with NGOs/non-profit organizations. The learning focus will be on business fundamentals within the world of digital communications companies and departments within organizations. We will cover the following subjects: Marketing/Sales, basics of Finance and Accounting (including understanding ROI), operations, and implementation. In addition to discussing materials and concepts in these business areas, students will be applying what they are learning by building a business plan of their own or on a team that is of interest to several students. As a result of taking this course, students will have a better understanding of the underlying issues facing business and be able to develop more relevant strategies and tactics to leverage the opportunities and challenges that digital media presents. At the completion of the class, students will be able present their ideas and initiatives in a more persuasive way to the decision makers in organizations by aligning their suggestions with the needs and issues facing the organization.

Student Testimonial>

“Business Fundamentals is the perfect crash course for any up and coming entrepreneurs in the program. While developing a comprehensive business plan in 10 weeks is a tall and, at time, stressful order, the course guides you, step by step, through product development, marketing, operations, finance, and more. It can be a great exercise to firm up your understanding of business in general or a challenge to take the first step towards making a reality out of your bright idea and produce something that’s ready to be pitched to investors.This class allowed me, as a marketer for a startup, to deepen my knowledge of the other areas within my company and also helped me better understand how each area interrelates to one another, as well as the priorities of my executives and board members. For me, now, business plans are no longer an insurmountable and intimidating project, but something that I know I can produce with confidence.”


COM 597: Ethics of Digital Media (Rufo)
Meets Law & Ethics Core Requirement
Thursdays, 6:00-9:50pm
CMU 126

Course Description>

Digital and social media raise new and profound ethical questions even as they provide novel and innovative answers to longstanding ethical challenges. At the same time, more informed consumers and profoundly impactful technologies are changing how businesses succeed, in large part because consumers, employees, and vendors now have the power and the knowledge to make decisions to align themselves with companies that share their values. From the bus protests in San Francisco to revelations of NSA collaboration by many tech companies, from conflict-free metals in Intel chips to the collapse of net neutrality, the importance of ethics in the digital industry landscape has never been more important when understanding business decisions, nor when making consumer decisions, because these days you vote for the future of the Internet with your dollars or your data.
This course tackles the ethical challenges of digital media from both sides of the spectrum, trying to highlight the good and the bad, the promise and the problem, of digital and social media. Topics will include microfinancing, crowdsourcing, personal branding, cyber-bullying, collaborative consumption, privacy, security, the nature of content, the nature of ownership, marketing, community, doxxing, representation, participation, and more. Many of these issues have a legal component, to be sure, but legal compliance and ethical behavior are rarely ever the same circles in the Venn diagram of human behavior. By making explicit our ethical perspectives, we can both identify more productive ways of thinking and exploring what digital can do, and about how we wish to position ourselves as both consumers and creators, users and media professionals. The class will entail reading, viewing, discussion, and a final project that can take multiple forms: written paper, media content, web project, etc.
If there are any questions, please don’t hesitate to contact Dr. Ken Rufo @ kenrufo@uw.edu.


COM 597: Visual Culture: The Power of Imagery in the Digital Age (Avni)
Tuesdays, 6:00-9:50pm
SAV 168

Course Description>

Over 500 million photographs a day get shared on Facebook, Flickr, Twitter, and Instagram as photography has taken center stage on today’s social media platforms. Those early inventors of photography would have found it hard to imagine the relative ease and speed with which today’s average Joe or June can snap, pick, and publish. This course will explore of the impact of the photographic image on social media, reportage, and visual storytelling, as well as create an understanding about the use of information design in data visualization and infographics. A few of the topics to be explored will include the “Social Psychology of the Selfie”, the “Seven Types of Social Photography”, “Photography as User Interface”, “Cellphone Photojournalism”, “User-generated Imagery vs. Professional Imagery”, and how data and information can be “Beautiful and Useful”. Students will gain an understanding of key design principles and knowledge about how to effectively use visual elements and graphics to complement and enhance storytelling. There will be readings from practitioners and thought leaders in the field, as well as discussion of applicable communication theories. The class will engage in some hands-on design and photography work, but no special equipment or graphic design skills are needed. True to the nature of this course, if you have a cellphone you have a camera.


COM 597: Social Media Analytics and the Measurement of Social Marketing Success (Steel)
Meets Research Methods Core Requirement
Mondays, 6:00-9:50pm
SAV 168

Course Description>

This course will introduce students to the fundamentals of social media analytics and social listening & monitoring, with a focus on tracking the overall social health of brands. We will compare and evaluate some of the analytics tools on the market and learn how to perform a social landscape audit, establish KPIs (key performance indicators), set social marketing goals, and determine methods for campaign performance tracking. We’ll deep dive into the components that comprise a thorough monthly monitoring report, including managed channel (Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, etc.) success metrics and KPI tracking, conversation sentiment and themes, competitive share of voice, influencer identification, data insights, listening & monitoring topics, and ROI. At the end of the quarter, we’ll examine the latest debates, tools, technologies, and social channels and their implications for social media analytics. Students who successfully complete the course will have gained hands-on experience analyzing and developing insights and tactical recommendations based on social media data. They will also leave armed with resources for following the latest trends and developments in social media marketing.


COM 597: Storytelling Intensive (Keller) 3 Credits
Wednesday-Sunday, July 9-13, 8:30am-4:30pm
CMU 302

Course Description>

Media creation is a multi-step effort, with thoughtful decision-making involved throughout the process. How do the choices you make in the telling and delivery of your story affect the reception of your message? This course is aimed at expanding thought about how web-delivered media is affecting storytelling. Additionally, students will gain hands-on practice in producing web-based video stories. The skills-based aspect of this course is designed to familiarize students with the technologies associated with storytelling. Specifically how to refine, shoot, edit, and distribute their web video.

Student Testimonial>

“Five consecutive full days in the classroom may look intimating, but not to worry, Drew Keller has a knack for effectively breaking up each eight-hour session. Drew takes students through a variety of exercises ranging from lecture and group discussions, to campus excursions to shoot footage, to hands-on video editing sessions. The first half of the course begins with the basics of storytelling through video. Drew makes sure each student has a firm grasp on film equipment use and vocabulary (light, sounds, camera, etc.). The second half is spent alone or in small teams shooting for and editing final projects which are screened the last day of class (Sunday afternoon). When I signed up for this course I cleared my schedule for the five days and devoted my entire attention to what I was learning. I decided to treat the course like a conference or even summer camp. Video editing is one of those tasks that always takes longer than you imagine, so be prepared to live and breathe your final project on days 3 through 5. But by the time you export your final video, you are quite amazed at what you were able to accomplish in such a short time span. Taking this course during the normal 10-week schedule probably allows for more internalization of the material and obviously additional time to learn shooting and video editing skills, however taking the 5-day deep dive proved to be extremely rewarding. This course is great for someone who doesn’t want to devote an entire 5 credits or quarter to video storytelling since it may not be the primary focus of their graduate school studies or career, but wants to get the higher level overview to be able to understand the process of creating a short online film from start to finish.”


Autumn 2014

CORE:

COM 546: Communication through Digital Media and Networks (Hosein)
Saturdays, 9:00am-5:00pm, September 27, October 11, 18, November 1, 15
PSP 505/506

Course Description>

The connectivity revolution created by the internet and mobile devices is changing the way humans interact, the way our professions and industries are organized, and the political face of the planet. The struggle to be heard is fierce, but being heard is no longer enough; successful engagement is often a deliberate interplay among the conveyance of relevant content, strategic listening, and dynamic conversation. Measurement also plays a key role in this equation, which helps to justify the effort and investment made in how we communicate, and determining how we can effectively sustain valuable relationships once we do connect. Ultimately, this new ecosystem supported by digital technologies, is challenging traditional social structures and institutional organizations, placing a higher premium on sometimes less formal, though often more powerful communities and networks. In this course, we will consider what it means to communicate through the creation of compelling content, in order to build and inspire the communities and networks necessary to engage during this historic time of chaos and change.


MCCN ELECTIVES:

COM 597: Story-Based Marketing: Using the Power of Story to Achieve Business Success (Captain)
Wednesdays, 6:00-9:50pm
CMU 126

Course Description>

How is it that in Hollywood, politics and business, those who tell the best story win, yet many leaders view storytelling as “fluffy” and “artsy?” And with more ways to communicate than ever, why are most marketers getting worse at it instead of better? The fact is that as the communication landscape changes at a breakneck pace, the ancient art of storytelling is more important than ever. Leaders cannot afford to ignore STORY as the engine to achieve success. This course will combine theory and practice to heighten your sensitivity to great business storytelling, to identify what works and what doesn’t and why, and then to put your learning to the test with an actual client. In the first half of the course, we will learn the essentials of exemplary story-based marketing, analyze specific brands successfully harnessing story and hear from speakers in the marketing and storytelling realm. In the latter half of the quarter, the class will be briefed by a real company with a real business challenge, then break into marketing teams to create a story-based plan designed to achieve the brand’s business objective. The course will culminate with your team’s presentation of your concept to the client. Story-based marketing is the new frontier and this class will equip you to pioneer the wilderness. This class is ideal for students who enjoy lively discussion of marketing cases and also wish to go beyond philosophy into a real world story- based marketing experience.


COM 597: Navigating Privacy Issues in Communication Contexts (Lingle)
Meets Research Methods or Law & Ethics Core Requirement
Mondays, 6:00-9:50pm
CMU 126

Course Description>

Privacy is one of the most urgent and yet confounding issues facing media producers and consumers. We are experiencing an ever-greater need to be “privacy literate,” but “privacy” in the culture of technology has a limited and selective relationship to “privacy” as most online audiences experience it. As reports of security breaches and questionable surveillance policies flood public awareness, professionals are learning how governments and businesses influence the way individuals and organizations work, plan, and communicate. As such, this is more than a technology issue: it’s also fundamentally a communication issue. In this course, we begin by building up a background in historical and scholarly approaches to privacy. This allows us to sharpen our skills in evaluating and applying privacy frameworks to the content we produce. As the course develops, we’ll work through exercises exploring various themes and concepts, such as the evolving meanings of public and private, official and commercial ethics, benefits and dangers of transparency, and values-centered design. All of this work will be geared toward a final project that allows you to demonstrate your thinking and argue effectively for a distinctive and pragmatic approach, all in the context of your own professional work.


MCDM ELECTIVES:

COM 597: Legal and Privacy Issues Associated with Data, Analytics, and Social Media (Baker)
Meets Law & Ethics Core Requirement
Wednesdays, 6:00-9:50pm
CMU 302

Course Description>

“Big Data”, “The Internet of Things”, “Behavioral Advertising”, “Analytics” — all buzzwords capturing the explosion of data and the promise of what we can do with data. Collecting, using, organizing, and sharing data and information also evokes legal issues and individual and collective uncertainty over who owns this data, what rights does one own, how does the data usage implicate privacy issues, how is and how should data use be regulated by the government, by private entities, for advertising, etc. This course will explore the legal issues associated with data usage, data collection, sharing of user information, and licensing. This course will pay particular attention to privacy laws in the United States, how the FTC and other regulators are approaching advertisers’ use of personal information, how organizations attempt to keep data secure, and how intellectual property rights protect (and don’t protect) data and databases. This course is designed both as a stand-alone course to satisfy the law and policy requirement of the program and as a companion to the law and policy course offered in the Spring, which focuses more on free expression and intellectual property issues around content.

Student Testimonial>

“Law & Policy is usually among the favorites of each cohort, and I completely understand that! Kraig is an incredibly knowledgeable professor who is detail oriented, and cares deeply about getting his students interested in the material. Law seems like a boring subject at first, but he makes sure that the material is tailored to the interests of each class and gives his students the freedom to adapt the course to their passions and learning styles. Also, this course is incredibly relevant to many questions we always have looming over our heads about copyright and content. This subject will continuously be relevant, and Kraig does a great job at making sure you’re confident in that.”


COM 583: Advanced Multimedia Storytelling: People and Story (Seattle Globalist)
Mondays, 6:00-9:50pm
CMU 302

Course Description>

Just a few years ago, creating rich multimedia was a boutique interest of elite journalists and filmmakers. But as lives and communities move further online, multimedia and character-driven, documentary-style storytelling is becoming a lingua franca for journalists, advocates, entrepreneurs, communities, and organizations. This course is a project-based class that teaches character-driven video production. Instruction will take students through story development, research and interview techniques, the technical aspects of shooting, editing, and production, as well as distribution and marketing. Emphasis will be given to reporting, interviewing, and the challenges of telling others’ stories well. Previous foundational MCDM storytelling class or demonstrated digital storytelling or video experience is strongly recommended. The Seattle Globalist is a nonprofit publication based in the UW Department of Communication that covers international connections in Seattle and specializes in human-centered multimedia journalism.

Student Testimonial>

“I can’t say enough good things about Alex Stonehill’s and Sarah Stuteville’s CLP People and Story class. Both are gifted educators and expert storytellers. As educators, I found them open and willing to engage many points of view with equal respect. That’s a rare talent. Their entry in the Seattle International Film Festival 2013 (Barzan) attests to the pedigree of their storytelling. They encouraged me to seek a challenging topic. In the few weeks we had in the class, they were mindful to remind the class to stay on pace. They grounded this advice in real-world experience. A big debt of thanks to the MCDM for leveraging Alex and Sarah’s abilities and experience into a rewarding experience; the class was over all too quickly.”


COM 597: Foundational User Centered Design Methodologies (Levine)
Meets Research Methods Core Requirement
Thursdays, 6:00-9:50pm
CMU 302

Course Description>

Ever wonder why Facebook and Instagram are so addictive or how Amazon and Groupon make buying feel so easy? Elegant user interfaces leverage a simple and intuitive design to solve user needs and meet business objectives while hiding complexity. Behind the technology are User Researchers, User Experience Designers and Information Architects working to simplify the user experience and eliminate obstacles that inhibit user goals. Learn the practical skills and the user centered design methodologies that are applied by these specialists, and how to apply them in practical ways when creating compelling user experiences. At the center of this course is user research, where we will learn how to create user personas, define user needs prototype designs and conduct usability studies. We will gain these skills by analyzing existing interfaces across desktop and mobile platforms, discussing what makes them effective, and provide an overview of tools and theories that guide user experience designers in their practice. By the completion of this course, you will have applied these skills to execute a usability test on wireframes designs that you create in class. No design experience necessary though some knowledge of Axure, Omnigraffle or Visio is encouraged.


COM 597: The Future of Marketing: How Digital Media is Changing the Practice of Commercial and Consumer Engagement (Salkowitz)
Tuesdays, 6:00-9:50pm
CMU 302

Course Description>

Rapid evolution of digital media and technology continues to disrupt the business of marketing, making it essential for professionals in the field to keep abreast of trends in a number of areas. This class focuses on the technologies shaping marketing, advertising, media, public relations and communications in the 2-4 year horizon and explores strategies of successful marketing organizations, both digital and traditional. We will examine the impact of social media, mobility, big data, new content and rich media distribution technologies, multi-platform storytelling, apps, and other digital innovation on audience engagement. We will study how consumers and audience expectations are changing, and how marketers must shift their models to accommodate new realities and expectations. Finally, we will look at changes to the structures and processes that marketing organizations – corporate, agency or otherwise – can adopt to become resilient in the face of rapid change. This class assumes a general familiarity with the practices of digital marketing and digital technologies. It is recommended for marketing, advertising and commercial communications professionals interested in developments at the cutting edge of the field. We will offer a survey of techniques and practices, including case studies, readings from contemporary practitioners and thought leaders, and expert guest speakers.

Student Testimonial>

“The first day of class, Rob Salkowitz tells you that there is no crystal ball to predict the future of marketing. However, it really does feel like we were able to divine the future. Based around a technique called scenario planning, as a class and as groups, we looked at the future of technology (from 3D printing to Internet of Things), content/content creation, and a whole host of other things as they would relate to marketing in the future and to make predictions.
It was a great class for thinking about trends and their influences and ways that marketers can stay ahead of the curve based on the knowledge that we have in-hand today.”


COM 597: Media Theory for Media Professionals (Rufo)
Meets Research Methods Core Requirement
Thursdays, 6:00-9:50pm
CMU 242

Course Description>

The digital and social landscape appears these days to be more fluid than solid, with new technologies and platforms displacing technologies that seemed themselves magical and revolutionary only a handful of months earlier. It can be difficult in this environment either to do much beyond play catch-up or overly narrow one’s specialty. But what if we could see the bigger picture? Theory, derived from the Greek word for “a way of seeing,” offers a chance to look at the broad reach of media history and derive lessons about how media behave, how they are innovated, why some succeed and some fail, and so on. This class focuses on media theory that is actually useful to the modern media professional (“there’s nothing so practical as a good theory,” as Scott Macklin likes to say), and juxtaposes theory with case studies of those media technologies that have disrupted successfully, as well as some that have failed to do so.


COM 592: Contextual Storytelling: Defining Best Practices for the Internet of Things (Zeller & Gauntt)
See Description
TBD

Course Description>

Real-time predictive content delivery is here, and the world is becoming an online network. The physical world of objects and locations is becoming an important interactive channel on par with PC, tablet and smartphones. Embedded sensors in devices, objects and locations now permit storytellers and community managers to design interactive experiences that anticipate an end-user’s expectations, and then proactively deliver the right content and services at the right time at the right place and in the right amount. The need to define frameworks for how we tell stories and manage communities for persuasion and influence must adapt when the whole world becomes an interactive desktop. Students involved in this Independent Study will directly impact research and practice for the evolving discipline of contextual storytelling. Accordingly, students will be recognized by Communication Leadership and presented to the larger community as cutting edge researchers and practitioners.
Class Meets: The class will meet for 3 formal sessions in the first week, on Saturday Sept 27th, and then the following week, and then meetings will be set up by the group. There will be 2-3 Saturday sessions and evening sessions throughout the quarter.
Prerequisites: Ideal student candidates should be in their second or third quarter in the MCCN or MCDM program. Having prior project management and/or user experience (UX) design or content strategy is a plus, but is not a requirement. The instructors seek out students who are open and ready to experiment effectively as a team.


COM 592: Flip the Media: Content Strategy and Community Engagement Practicum (Stonehill) 1-2 Credits
Mondays, TBD
CMU 244

Course Description>

Flip the Media is the independent student publication of the Comm Lead program. It is an outward-facing channel for news and analysis from Comm Lead students and faculty on the crossroads of media, culture and technology. Autumn quarter a select group of independent study students will have a unique opportunity to reinvent Flip the Media, bringing the channel up to date with the latest platforms and content strategies. Participating students will develop marketable skills in content strategy, community engagement, analytics, SEO, WordPress, web design, brand development and online journalism, and are afforded significant publication opportunities. This course is available as an independent study for one or two credits, depending on commitment, or as a non-credit experience. During Autumn Quarter, meetings will be held weekly on Monday evenings. Contact Faculty Adviser Alex Stonehill at stonehil(at)u.washington.edu for more information.